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  April 2019
Columns
volume 16 number 1
 
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Alicia Winski
Revisiting Neverland
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Marie C Lecrivain
Shelia Murphy's Reporting Live From You Know Where
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Rich Follett
Marie Slaight's "The Antigone Poems"
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Marie C Lecrivain
Brendan Constantine's Bouncy Bounce
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Marie C Lecrivain April 2019
   

 

Brendan Constantine's Bouncy Bounce

Say this aloud: the sky is not a river
It won’t deepen if you fall in.
- from Bouncy Bounce

    For those of you who’re not familiar with the poet Brendan Constantine, or have always wanted to read his work, and have yet to do so, a good place to start would be his new chapbook, Bouncy Bounce (© 2018 Blue Horse Press), or his back catalogue of excellent work.
    More than Constantine’s other works, Bouncy Bounce, as the title suggest, is a buoyant volume of poetry; highly enjoyable, and quick to breeze through, until you find yourself mesmerized, and then, like a wayward ball on the playground, it smacks square you in the face. There’s a trick built into Bouncy Bounce, like that infamous scene from Lawrence of Arabia, where Lawrence imparts to Potter, his British comrade, “The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts.”
    Poetry should hurt, otherwise, what’s the point in writing/reading it. The more painful, the more memorable, and this is where, Constantine, like W. S. Merwin, succeeds beautifully. There’s an intimacy in Constantine’s poems, which make the reader feel like they’re being taken into his confidence, to share his upside-down view of the universe, in regards to family (“Open Heart Perjury” and “Crib”); anthropomorphism as a means of recognizing ourselves (“Field Trip” and “At a Stumble”); and who we truly are, in relation to, as well in our relationships with each other (“Out in the Air”), especially in, what I believe, is the most powerful poem to illustrate this, “The Arrival of the Sleepers”:


    The sleepers came like curtains in the blown in the wind.
    The sleepers came here
    The came and blew softly into the firelight
    And they were sleeping
    And they were sleeping where they stood
    And more sleepers came
    And they lay their bodies down
    And they lay their long bodies over each other
    And they did not stir
    And they did not stir
    The sleepers slept like stones in a bog
    They slept like a bog
    They were a bog of sleeping sleepers
    And if you had been here
    If you had walked over them
    You would have sunk down into them
    Until just your head and arms could be seen
    And you would have waved and struggled
    You would have struggled
    Like I struggled
    Until at last you slept beside me


© 2018 Brendan Constantine

    If, for no other reason, you wish to grow, as a person, through poetry, then Bouncy Bounce is the perfect choice to initiate that process. And, as with all of Constantine’s work, this chapbook deserves a permanent place on your bookshelf.

Bouncy Bounce, © 2018 Blue Horse Press, Brendan Constantine, ISBN-10: 069282096, ISBN-13: 978-0692820964, 33 pages, $10 (US).

copyright 2019 Marie C Lecrivain

   


Marie C Lecrivain


author's bio

    Marie C Lecrivain is the executive editor and publisher of poeticdiversity: the litzine of Los Angeles, a jewelry designer, and a writer in residence at her apartment.
    Her prose and poetry have appeared in a number of journals and anthologies, including: Edgar Allen Poetry Journal, The Los Angeles Review, Nonbinary Review, Gargoyle, Spillway, States of the Union, Orbis, A New Ulster, and others.
    Marie's newest poetry chapbook, Fourth Planet From the Sun, will be published in 2018 by Rum Razor Press. She's an associate fiction/essay editor for The Good Works Review, and the editor of several anthologies including Octavia's Brood: Words and Art inspired by O.E. Butler (© 2014 Sybaritic Press), and Rubicon: Words and Art Inspired by Oscar Wilde's "De Profundis" (© 2015 Sybaritic Press).
    Marie's avocations include photography; meditation; Libers CCXX and XV; marmosets; Christopher Eccleston, H.P. Lovecraft, and Sean Bean (depending on what day of the week it is); her co-owned cat Guinness; misfit and vintage dolls; the number seven, and sensual tributes upon her neck from male artists-except male poets, who only write about it.

    "Writing is like having sex with a beautiful freak; adventurous and uncomfortable to the extreme." - m. lecrivain 2004

AL-Khemia Poetica marie.lecrivain.pd@gmail.com